decolonization

anarchism, nature, science, emotion

“Labor was the first price, the original purchase–money that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labor, that all wealth of the world was originally purchased.”

Adam Smith

“For a seed to achieve its greatest expression, it must come completely undone. The shell cracks, its insides come out and everything changes. To someone who doesn’t understand growth, it would look like complete destruction.”

– Cynthia Occelli

“In the case of suffering, as long as we feel that there is some fundamental way out, we will not see what it actually is or notice its possibilities. When we become sensitive and aware enough to see that there really is no way out and we surrender to that fact, then we can begin to make some interesting discoveries. We see first that our resistance has been based on our expectations about ourselves and our lives. We see that our ego ideal-our image of who we should or could be, and what life could or should be-is not as solid or necessary as we thought. We see that all of this is our own self-maintained drama and we see its ultimate nonexistence. And in that moment, we let go.”

– Reggie Ray via Shambhala Sun http://www.shambhalasun.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2237&Itemid=0

This aspect of taking refuge is particularly applicable in America, where it is quite fashionable to blame everything on others and to feel that all kinds of elements in one’s relationships or surroundings are unhealthy or polluted.

We react with resentment.

But once we begin to do that, there is no way. The world becomes divided into two sections: sacred and profane, or that which is good and proper and that which is regarded as a bad job or a necessary evil. Taking refuge in the Dharma, taking passionless approach, means that all life is regarded as a fertile situation and a learning situation, always.

Whatever occurs—is part of the learning process. So there is nothing to blame; everything is the path, everything is Dharma.

– Chogyam Trungpa ~ The Heart of the Buddha